Shoulder

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Rotator cuff (arthroscopic) – Shoulder arthroscopy. Shoulder arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera called an arthroscope to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your shoulder joint. The arthroscope is inserted through a small cut (incision) in your skin.

Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Signs and symptoms typically begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one to three years.

A dislocated shoulder is when the head of the humerus is out of the shoulder joint. Symptoms include shoulder pain and instability. Complications may include a Bankart lesion, Hill-Sachs lesion, rotator cuff tear, or injury to the axillary nerve.

The term SLAP stands for Superior Labrum Anterior and Posterior. In a SLAP injury, the top (superior) part of the labrum is injured. This top area is also where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum. A SLAP tear occurs both in front (anterior) and back (posterior) of this attachment point.

Subacromial decompression (acromioplasty) is an operation on your shoulder. It’s used to treat a condition called shoulder impingement. This is when the bones and tendons in your shoulder rub against each other when you raise your arm, causing pain. The word ‘subacromial‘ means ‘under the acromion’.

Shoulder replacement – An orthopedic surgeon will replace the natural bone in the ball and socket of your shoulder joint with a material that could be metal or plastic. It’s a major surgery that’ll keep you in the hospital for several days. You’ll also need several weeks of physical therapy afterward.

The intra-articular steroid injections are a treatment method for relief from joint pain. These steroids are used to decrease the inflammatory reaction associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The most prominent indication of the use of such steroid injection is conservative management of an impingement.

Fractures are broken bones. Fractures commonly involve the clavicle (collar bone), proximal humerus (top of the upper arm bone), and scapula (shoulder blade). Dislocations occur when the bones on opposite sides of a joint do not line up. Dislocations can involve any of three different joints.